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dc.contributor.authorBeavan, Jessica
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-21T11:15:17Z
dc.date.available2020-07-21T11:15:17Z
dc.date.issued2016-06
dc.identifier.citationInt J Stroke. 2016 Jun;11(4):399-411. doi: 10.1177/1747493016639057. Epub 2016 Mar 22en
dc.identifier.urihttps://orda.derbyhospitals.nhs.uk/handle/123456789/2283
dc.identifier.urihttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1747493016639057
dc.description.abstractPost-stroke dysphagia (a difficulty in swallowing after a stroke) is a common and expensive complication of acute stroke and is associated with increased mortality, morbidity, and institutionalization due in part to aspiration, pneumonia, and malnutrition. Although most patients recover swallowing spontaneously, a significant minority still have dysphagia at six months. Although multiple advances have been made in the hyperacute treatment of stroke and secondary prevention, the management of dysphagia post-stroke remains a neglected area of research, and its optimal management, including diagnosis, investigation and treatment, have still to be defined.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectStrokeen
dc.subjectDysphagiaen
dc.subjectRehabilitationen
dc.subjectTreatmenten
dc.titlePost-stroke dysphagia: A review and design considerations for future trialsen
dc.typeArticleen


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